Mar
19
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Saul Weiner, MD

Patient-Collected Audio Recorded Encounters for Provider Feedback to Reduce Contextual Errors: An Implementation Study

Saul Weiner, MD

University of Illinois College of Medicine | Chicago

ABSTRACT: Dr. Weiner will discuss his ongoing research Patient-Collected Audio Recorded Encounters for Provider Feedback to Reduce Contextual Errors which utilizes an Effectiveness-Implementation type 2 hybrid design to study an innovative quality improvement project to enhance physician attention to patient life context in care planning.  The effectiveness of an audit & feedback intervention is assessed utilizing a  stepped wedge cluster randomized trial as it rolls out across six health care facilities. The implementation process is guided by the RE-AIM framework.

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Apr
16
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Maya Mathur

Sensitivity analyses for unmeasured confounding in studies and meta-analyses

Maya Mathur, PhD

Stanford University

Abstract: Comparisons between interventions. Such analyses are lacking in pediatric obesity management. This talk will review the methods and results of cost-effectiveness analyses using a microsimulation model of the national implementation of childhood obesity interventions.

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Apr
23
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Guanglei Hong

Weighting-Based Sensitivity Analysis in Causal Mediation Studies

Guanglei Hong, PhD

University of Chicago

Abstract: Through a sensitivity analysis, the analyst attempts to determine whether a conclusion of causal inference could be easily reversed by a plausible violation of an identification assumption. Analytic conclusions that are harder to alter by such a violation are expected to add a higher value to scientific knowledge about causality. This article presents a weighting-based approach to sensitivity analysis for causal mediation studies. Extending the ratio-of-mediator-probability weighting (RMPW) method for identifying natural indirect effect and natural direct effect, the new strategy assesses potential bias in the presence of omitted pretreatment or posttreatment covariates. Such omissions may undermine the causal validity of analytic conclusions. The weighting approach to sensitivity analysis reduces the reliance on functional form assumptions and removes constraints on the measurement scales for the mediator, the outcome, and the omitted covariates. In its essence, the discrepancy between a new weight that adjusts for an omitted confounder and an initial weight that omits the confounder captures the role of the confounder that contributes to the bias. The effect size of the bias due to omitted confounding of the mediator-outcome relationship is a product of two sensitivity parameters, one associated with the degree to which the omitted confounders predict the mediator and the other associated with the degree to which they predict the outcome. The article provides an application example and concludes with a discussion of broad applications of this new approach to sensitivity analysis. Supplementary material includes R code for implementing the proposed sensitivity analysis procedure.

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Apr
30
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Arthur Robin Williams

OUD Cascade of Care and Quality Measure Development

Arthur Robin Williams, MD

Columbia University, Irving Medical School

Abstract: Amid worsening opioid overdose death rates, the nation continues to face a persistent addiction treatment gap limiting access to quality care for opioid use disorder (OUD). Three FDA-approved medications (methadone, buprenorphine, and extended-release naltrexone) have high quality evidence demonstrating reductions in drug use and overdose events, but most individuals with OUD do not receive them. The development of a unified public health framework, such as a Cascade of Care, could improve system level practice and treatment outcomes. This presentation details an expanded OUD treatment cascade, first published in 2017, with additional attention to prevention stages and both individual-level and population-based services to better inform efforts at the state and federal level. The proposed cascade framework has attracted considerable interest from federal agencies including the CDC and NIDA along with policy-makers nationwide. Including recent literature on pharmacotherapy for OUD and evidence-based interventions related to prevention, identification, and treatment of individuals with OUD, the presentation includes updated figures from the 2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Many currently employed interventions (prescriber guidelines, prescription monitoring programs, naloxone rescue) address prevention of OUD or downstream complications but not treatment of the underlying disorder itself. An OUD Cascade of Care framework could help structure local and national efforts to combat the opioid epidemic by identifying key targets, interventions, and quality indicators across populations and settings to achieve these ends. Improved data collection and reporting methodology will be imperative.

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May
31
to Jun 1

ISGMH: 2019 National LGBTQ Health Conference

6th National LGBTQ Health Conference:
Bridging Research & Practice

Friday May 31st to Saturday June 1st 2019
With an NIH Pre-Conference Workshop on Thursday May 30th
At Emory University in Atlanta, GA.


About the Conference

The National LGBTQ Health Conference is an interdisciplinary translational research conference bringing together scientists, public health professionals, and healthcare providers to discuss issues affecting the health and wellbeing of the LGBTQ community while fostering professional development and networking opportunities.


Conference Highlights

  • Nationally-recognized Keynote Speakers: Dr. Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, and Kierra Johnson, Deputy Executive Director of the National LGBTQ Task Force

  • Expert panel and breakout sessions showcasing emerging research and practice

  • Poster symposium

  • Professional Development Institute hosted by NIH on May 30

  • Continuing education units will be offered

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Mar
12
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Kara Palamountain

Ensuring Success: Introduction & Implementation of Point of Care Testing in sub-Saharan Africa

Kara Palamountain, MBA

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management

Abstract: Reducing the time it takes to diagnose and treat persons living with HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis is critical for the individual and to public health.  This presentation identifies three approaches for reducing time to diagnosis and treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, including: 1) Point of Care (POC) Tests 2) Placement of POC devices within clinics and health systems and 3) optimizing sample and result transport networks.

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Mar
5
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: David Mohr & Madhu Reddy

Re-envisioning Digital Mental Health: addressing the research-to-practice gap

David Mohr, Ph.D. & Madhu Reddy, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

ABSTRACT:
Depression is a common problem that imposes a tremendous societal burden in terms of cost, morbidity, quality of life, and mortality. However, few people are able to obtain adequate or appropriate treatment for depression. Digital mental health (DMH) technologies such as web-based and mobile applications have shown great potential, with a large number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) consistently demonstrating efficacy, particularly when coupled with support from a clinician or coordinator. Yet for all of the promise, evidence shows these findings do not carry over when these tools are implemented in real-world settings. Indeed, a large-scale implementation trial of two well-known web-based tools (Beating the Blues and MoodGym) for treating depression found that patients did not want to engage with the tools. This research-to-practice gap is not being addressed by our current approaches for designing, implementing, and evaluating DMH technologies. In particular, we face three major challenges: (1) these technologies are often designed without sufficient stakeholder input throughout the design process; (2) we often plan for implementation only after the efficacy testing is completed; and (3) technological capabilities, care systems, and user expectations change rapidly but we currently are not flexible and rapid in how we respond to these changes.

In this presentation, we will discuss how we are attempting to address these research-to-practice gaps through our Accelerated Creation-to-Sustainment (ACTS) model developed by our multidisciplinary team of clinical sciences and HCI researchers. In particular, we will focus on the work that we are doing to try to better understand the needs of users, both patient and healthcare organization stakeholders, in terms of DMH technologies and services. We will then conclude with some thoughts about future directions for the field of digital mental health.

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Feb
19
to Feb 20

PSMG: Milica Miočević

Bayesian Mediation Analysis

Milica Miočević, PhD

Utrecht University

Abstract: Mediation analysis is used to study intermediate variables (M) that transmit the effect an independent variable (X) has on a dependent variable (Y). For example, a researcher might be interested in whether an intervention designed to reduce unhealthy lifestyle behaviors (X) affects fruit and vegetable consumption (M), which in turn affects general health (Y). In this study, the quantity of interest is the indirect effect of the intervention on general health through fruit and vegetable consumption. Two prominent approaches to data analysis are the classical (also called “frequentist”) and the Bayesian approach. In recent years researchers in social sciences have turned to Bayesian methods when they encounter convergence issues (Chen, Choi, Weiss, & Stapleton, 2014), issues due to small samples (Lee & Song, 2004), and when they wish to report the probability that a parameter lies within a certain interval (Rindskopf, 2012).In the frequentist framework, evidence for the presence of mediation is obtained by testing the statistical significance of the product of coefficients comprising the indirect effect. The distribution of the mediated effect is often asymmetric (Craig, 1936; Lomnicki, 1967; Springer & Thompson, 1966), and the best classical methods for evaluating the significance of the mediated effect either take the asymmetric distribution of the product into account or make no distributional assumptions at all (Cheung 2007, 2009; MacKinnon, Fritz, Williams, & Lockwood 2007; MacKinnon, Lockwood, & Williams, 2004; MacKinnon, Lockwood, Hoffmann, West, & Sheets, 2002; MacKinnon, et al., 1995; Shrout & Bolger, 2002; Tofighi & MacKinnon, 2011; Valente, Gonzalez, Miočević, & MacKinnon, 2016; Yuan & MacKinnon, 2009).Bayesian methods offer an easy way to take into account the asymmetric distribution of the mediated effect, and to compute functions of the mediated effect, e.g. effect size measures and causal estimates of indirect and direct effects. Furthermore, Bayesian methods provide an intuitive framework for the inclusion of relevant prior information into the statistical analysis. In this talk I will discuss the pros and cons of Bayesian methods for mediation analysis, and I will illustrate some advantages and challenges of Bayesian mediation analysis using an example data set from a study of alcohol consumption of college students in the United States. I will conclude with recommendations that can be made for applied researchers based on the methodological literature on Bayesian mediation analysis thus far, and with some future directions for this line of research.

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Feb
5
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Aaron Lyon

How implementable is that evidence-based practice?

Designing and supporting streamlined and contextually-appropriate innovations in behavioral health

Aaron Lyon, Ph.D.
University of Washington

ABSTRACT:
At their core, evidence-based psychosocial interventions (EBPIs) can be considered products intended for a range of different types of users. Usability – the extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction – is a key “upstream” determinant of implementation and service outcomes. Drawing from the field of user-centered design, this session will discuss common usability issues encountered for EBPIs in behavioral health, how they impact implementation outcomes, and the application of user-centered design methodologies to assess and improve the usability and implementability of complex psychosocial interventions in behavioral health.

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Jan
29
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Sandro Galea

SYSTEMS SCIENCE AND POPULATION HEALTH

Sandro Galea, M.D., Ph.D.
Boston University

ABSTRACT:
Population health is the product of complex systems. It is characterized by discontinuities, non-linearities, reciprocity, and emergent properties. This requires clarity about our conceptualization of population health and the approaches we take towards answering population health science questions. This presentation will discuss the fundamental principles of population health science and how it intersects with complex systems perspectives, using examples from ongoing modeling work.

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Jan
22
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Gregory E. Simon

Predicting suicidal behavior:

Artificial intelligence for actual human users

Gregory E. Simon, MD, MPH
Kaiser Permanente

ABSTRACT:
This presentation will describe work by the NIMH-funded Mental Health Research Network (www.mhresearchnetwork.org) to develop and implement tools to identify and assess risk of suicidal behavior in large integrated healthcare systems.  Using this example, the presentation will describe collaboration with health system stakeholders in the development and implementation of machine learning prediction models.  Discussion will illustrate general principles to improve the practical utility of machine learning or artificial intelligence tools.

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Jan
15
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Lisa Hirschhorn

How Rwanda succeeded: Using implementation science to understand the success in reducing under-5 mortality between 2000 and 2015

Lisa Hirschhorn, M.D., MPH
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

ABSTRACT:
Understanding how some low and middle income countries have been more successful in dropping mortality in children under5 is a high priority as the global community works to continue in work to achieve effective universal health coverage and the new Sustainable Development Goals. Rwanda has been a leader in this area, yet how they achieved a remarkable decline despite having to rebuild their health system starting in the 2003. We will present the process to develop and apply an Implementation science framework and methods to understand the implementation strategies to expand evidence based interventions know to reduce under-5 mortality and results in developing transferable knowledge

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Jan
8
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Mariel Finucane

What Works for Whom?
Bayesian Adaptive Design for Prevention Research

Mariel Finucane, PhD

M50 | Mathematica Policy Research

ABSTRACT: A Bayesian approach to randomized program evaluations efficiently identifies what works for whom. The Bayesian design adapts to accumulating evidence: Over the course of an evaluation, more study subjects are allocated to treatment arms that are more promising, given the specific subgroup from which each subject comes. We identify conditions under which there is more than a 90% chance that inference from the Bayesian adaptive design is superior to inference from a standard design, using less than one third the sample size.

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Dec
15
8:00 AM08:00

Abstract Deadline: 2019 National LGBTQ Health Conference

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Call for Abstracts:
Due December 15th 2018

6th National LGBTQ Health Conference:
Bridging Research & Practice

Friday May 31st to Saturday June 1st 2019
With an NIH Pre-Conference Workshop on Thursday May 30th
At Emory University in Atlanta, GA.

Abstracts due: December 15th 2018

 For more Information please visit the conference website: https://lgbtqconference.dryfta.com/en/

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Dec
4
7:00 AM07:00

2018 D&I Conference: Implementation Science and Equity Adjunct Meeting

11th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health

Implementation Science and Equity
Adjunct Meeting

Tuesday December 4th 2018
Renaissance Washington, DC
999 9th Street, NW
Washington, DC 2001

Meeting Objectives:

  • Develop a shared understanding of the importance of integrating racial and ethnic equity and inclusion in implementation science and practice

  • Create a space for interested participants to commit to ongoing email, phone, and/or virtual conversations to develop a research agenda and call to action for the implementation research community on our role in supporting equitable outcomes.

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Dec
3
to Dec 5

2018 D&I Conference: Ce-PIM Presentations

11th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health

Scaling up Effective Health and Healthcare: Advancing the Research Agenda and Necessary Infrastructure

Monday December 3rd to Wednesday December 5th 2018
Renaissance Washington, DC
999 9th Street, NW
Washington, DC 2001

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Nov
27
12:00 PM12:00

Marion Forgatch: Taking an Evidence Based Parenting Program from the Cradle into the Community: A Case Study

Taking an Evidence Based Parenting Program from the Cradle into the Community: A Case Study

Marion Forgatch, PhD
Oregon Social Learning Center

ABSTRACT:
Interventions for children and youth were developed and subjected to rigorous testing in the 20th century, resulting in a rich supply of parenting programs that produce positive outcomes. Unfortunately, these programs are seldom available in community service agencies today, leaving families unable to reap their benefits. An important challenge for the 21st century is to install these evidence based programs in community service agencies with fidelity, making them accessible to families seeking help. Yet, transferring these programs from the ivory towers where they were developed to the unruly field of practice is a delicate process facing many challenges. This presentation is a case study that describes the development of an evidence based parenting program, GenerationPMTO, and its entry into the field of implementation. GenerationPMTO is one of the progenitor parenting programs that prevents and reduces child and adolescent behavior problems (e.g., externalizing and internalizing behavior, delinquency, police arrests, and deviant peer association), with collateral family benefits that include improved marital relationships, increased income, and reduced maternal depression and police arrests (Patterson, Forgatch, & DeGarmo, 2010). Findings are presented from a Full Transfer approach to implementation, in which the program developer delivers governing authority to the adopting community. Implementation data are provided. Outcomes include adoption in terms of numbers of practitioners and settings, practitioner training in terms of % of trainees completing with certification, practitioner fidelity across multiple generations of trainees, and increasing reach. Data from prevention and clinical interventions from GenerationPMTO efficacy and effectiveness trials are provided for the intervention; implementation outcomes were obtained from four nationwide implementations (i.e., Norway, Iceland, the Netherlands, and Denmark).  

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Nov
13
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD

Optimizing Study Designs to Better Inform Individualized Treatment Decisions

Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD
Stanford University

ABSTRACT:
A paradigm shift is occurring in medicine and public health. Previously, trials were intended to identify the intervention with the greatest expected effect for a group of patients at risk for or diagnosed with a given disease or condition. As new and better interventions were identified this way, practice shifted towards the superior interventions. However, even if an intervention is best on average, some individuals may do better than expected while others may not do as well. Similarly, even if all individuals do about the same, some may have more serious adverse events/harms/unintended effects and others may have fewer. If differences in outcomes and harms with each intervention can be predicted for individuals, then the choice of intervention can be tailored and individualized – each person can get the intervention that most ideally achieves better health outcomes while minimizing harms for that person in particular. This is the new paradigm of individualized care, personalized medicine and health.   Individualized care holds great promise, but achieving this promise presents a number of challenges. One particular challenge that we focus on is when to individualize care based on current knowledge (information from completed studies) and when and how to design additional studies that should be conducted before care is individualized. Currently most trials focus on showing effects for the group as a whole. After the trial concludes, additional analyses attempt to predict which subgroups will benefit more from which treatment. Even when these analyses find differences, they may be highly uncertain because the original trial was not made large enough to precisely measure these differences at these subgroup levels. The subgroup findings are suggestive, and it may be tempting to individualize treatment based on them. Yet, because treatments carry both the promise of benefits and risks of harms and side-effects, additional studies may be warranted. But when? And how large of a study? And on which subgroups should the new study focus on?    Towards answering these questions, we describe a framework we developed. We then apply this framework using simulation model examples to characterize what are the characteristics of the subgroups and their expected benefits, risks and associated uncertainties as well as the maximum available sample size that determines optimal study designs for individualization decisions. In many cases, we consider optimal study designs diverge strongly (but predictably) from proportional random sampling schemes like those currently used in many randomized trials.

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Nov
12
12:00 PM12:00

TC-CFAR Seminar Series: Joshua Leonard and Chisu Song

Engineering extracellular vesicle-mediated delivery of targeted nucleases to inactive HIV proviral DNA.

Joshua L. Leonard, PhD
Northwestern University

Chisu Song, PhD
Northwestern University

Monday November 12, 2018
12PM to 1PM CDT

Drs. Joshua Leonard and Chisu Song will present the results of their Third Coast CFAR pilot projects.

Joshua L. Leonard, PhD is an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at Northwestern University McCormick School of Engineering. His research group works at the interface of systems biology and synthetic biology in order to probe and program the function of complex, multicellular systems to develop transformative biotechnologies and enable a new paradigm of design-driven medicine. Using the tools of synthetic biology, biomolecular engineering, computational systems biology, and gene therapy, they develop technologies including programmable cell-based “devices,” immune therapies for cancer and chronic disease, smart vaccines, biosensors for global health applications, and tools for advanced metabolic engineering. By bringing an engineering approach to the investigation, design, and construction of biological systems, Dr. Leonard’s research group is advancing the frontiers of design-driven medicine to address unmet medical needs and create safe, effective, and long-lasting treatment options that improve both quantity and quality of life. 

Chisu Song, PhD is a research assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Northwestern University. Dr. Song received his doctorate in Virology at the University of Alabama-Birmingham in 2001. He completed his postdoctoral training in Microbiology and Hematology-Oncology at the University of Alabama and Microbiology and Immunology at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Song's work includes studying APOBEC3G to identify potential strategies for sustained remission in individuals with HIV. 

Attend in person: Stonewall Conference Rooms, 625 N Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60611

Attend remotely: https://bluejeans.com/169025110

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Nov
6
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: HIV/AIDS Prevention - J.D. Smith, PhD & Nanette Benbow, MAS

Landscape of Funded Implementation Research in HIV/AIDS: A Scoping Review of
Methodological and Intervention Characteristics

JD Smith, PhD & Nanette Benbow, MAS
Northwestern University

ABSTRACT:
JD and Nanette will present results from a scoping review of NIH-funded grants which will identify the proportion and characteristics of HIV-related implementation research studies funded by NIH, discuss multiple implementation research methods used to study interventions targeting various points in the HIV prevention and care continuums, and present potential opportunities for next steps.

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Nov
1
8:30 AM08:30

TC-CFAR Symposium: Third Coast Center for AIDS Research 2018 Annual Symposium

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Thursday November 1st, 2018
8:30AM to 4:30PM CDT
Gordon Center for Integrative Sciences, The University of Chicago

Join the Third Coast Center for AIDS Research 2018 Annual Symposium Ending the HIV Epidemic: Think Globally, Act Locally. This multidisciplinary symposium will draw important connections between HIV research in global settings and the lessons researchers can apply to their domestic work. Examples of the “global to local” approach will include innovations in HIV testing, prevention and care, as well as implementation science approaches to scale up of new interventions, and the role of research on non-communicable diseases and HIV.

Ambassador Deborah L. Birx, United States Global AIDS Coordinator will provide a keynote lecture on the scale up of HIV treatment through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programs.

Ce-PIM Director, Dr. C Hendricks Brown, will join Dr. Carlos Del Rio (Emory) and Dr. Moira McNulty (Univ of Chicago) as a presenter in Session III: Implementation Science to Accelerate the Cascades.

For more more information on this symposium, including the agenda, please visit: http://www.thirdcoastcfar.org/annual-symposium/

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Oct
30
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Personalized Medicine - Philip Greenland & Joyce Ho

The NIH Precision Medicine Initiative: The All of Us Research Program

Philip Greenland, M.D.
Joyce Ho, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

ABSTRACT:
Precision medicine is a concept that was nearly unheard of prior to 2008, but in 2018, PubMed listed nearly 4000 citations for the term “precision medicine.” The National Institutes of Health launched an ambitious precision medicine initiative in 2015 and began recruiting participants into a 1 million person cohort study in 2017. To date, nearly 100,000 people have joined this effort, now called the “All of Us Research Program.” As described by the NIH, All of Us is “more than just a medical research program.” It is described as “a celebration of the American spirit in all its diversity and capacity to generate positive change.” The goal of the cohort study is to create a health care environment that is based on specific treatments for specific individuals. It takes into account factors like where a person lives, what activities they do, and what is their family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does become ill, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best. The study expects to provide researchers, patients, and doctors the information they need to make tailored recommendations, relevant to people of different backgrounds, ages, or regions.In this talk, Drs. Ho and Greenland will discuss the overall program goals as well as the evolving data elements and genomic analysis plan, and the researcher portal, which will enable researchers from anywhere to utilize data from the study. We will also discuss related projects, like the UK Biobank and the Million Veterans Study, to learn from those experiences and anticipate what we may learn from the All of Us Research Program.

Keywords: precision medicine; personalized medicine; genetics; health risks

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Oct
23
12:00 PM12:00

Kevin Haggerty: Implementation and dissemination of the Communities That Care prevention system to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health

Implementation and dissemination of the Communities That Care prevention system to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health

Kevin Haggerty, Ph.D.
Social Development Research Group
University of Washington

ABSTRACT: 

Communities That Care (CTC) is a community planning system for the prevention of youth behavior problems. CTC empowers community stakeholders and decision makers to select and implement tested and effective policies and programs most appropriate to their community’s needs by using strategic consultation, training, and research-based tools. We see CTC as providing what NIRN calls the “enabling context” for successful implementation of prevention focused EBPs.  This session will briefly summarize findings from the NIH/NIDA-funded community-randomized trial of CTC and describe efforts to expand capacity for implementation at scale using a new web-based video-assisted training system. The CTC prevention system has been shown to assist local communities in achieving these goals in a randomized trial. We will discuss how we have continued to focus on high quality implementation from the randomized trial to real world application of CTC.

Please note: Unfortunately, the audio quality of this video recording is poor. Most of Dr. Haggerty’s excellent presentation is decipherable but there are periodic disruptions.

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Oct
22
12:00 PM12:00

TC-CFAR Seminar Series: Judith S. Currier

Cardiovascular Disease in HIV: Mechanisms and Potential Interventions

Judith S. Currier, MD, MsC
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)

Monday October 22nd, 2018
12PM to 1PM CDT

Dr. Currier is Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Co-Director of the Center for AIDS Research and Education Center (CARE) in the Department of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is Chair of the NIH sponsored AIDS Clinical Trials Group. Her research has focused on HIV therapeutics and long-term complications of HIV disease with an emphasis on sex differences and antiretroviral therapy, cardiovascular disease, and women’s health.

Attend in person: Stonewall Conference Rooms, 625 N Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60611

Attend remotely: https://bluejeans.com/169025110

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Oct
16
12:00 PM12:00

Larry V. Hedges: Improving Generalization from Randomized Trials for Policy Purposes

Improving Generalization from Randomized Trials for Policy Purposes

Larry V. Hedges, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

ABSTRACT:
Randomized trials provide the gold standard of internal validity for making causal inferences about the effects of interventions.  However, randomized trials are seldom conducted using probability samples that might provide the same gold standard of generalizability (external validity). I will discuss methods to quantify and improve the generalizability of findings from randomized trials conducted to inform policy and illustrate these ideas with the FIRST trial.  I will begin by formalizing some subjective notions of generalizability in terms of estimating average treatment effects in well-defined inference populations.    The problem is to use a study sample to estimate parameters of the distribution of treatment effects (e.g., the average treatment effect) in an inference population.  When study samples are not probability samples, the inference process relies on matching the study sample to the inference population on a potentially large number of covariates that are related to variation in treatment effects.  I outline methods that can, under definable assumptions, yield estimates of the population average treatment effects are unbiased (or nearly so) with a standard error depends largely on how well the study sample matches the inference population.  If the standard error is reasonably small, the study sample yields generalizable effects, but if it is large (or even infinite, as it can be) the evidence in the study sample has little or no generalizability to the inference population.  I use the Flexibility In duty hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial to illustrate the use of these ideas.

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Oct
11
12:00 PM12:00

ISGMH: Current Issues in LGBTQ Health Lecture Series – Dr. Sari van Anders

Join our partners, ISGMH, for their “Current Issues in LGBTQ Health” lecture series featuring Dr. Sari Van Anders. ISGMH is cosponsoring this event with the Northwestern Department of Psychology.

This lecture will be on Thursday, October 11th 2018 in the Stonewall Conference Room of 625 N. Michigan Suite 1400. Stay tuned for more details!

To RSVP, please visit this page >>

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Oct
9
12:00 PM12:00

Brian S. Mittman: Evaluating complex interventions: Confronting and guiding (versus ignoring and suppressing) heterogeneity and adaptation

Evaluating complex interventions: Confronting and guiding (versus ignoring and suppressing) heterogeneity and adaptation

Brian S. Mittman, Ph.D.
Kaiser Permanente

ABSTRACT:
Implementation strategies and many of the clinical and health service delivery interventions they aim to implement are characterized by multiple components targeting multiple behaviors and levels and are often characterized by extreme heterogeneity and adaptability.  Although researchers often attempt to standardize and achieve fidelity to highly-specified manualized intervention protocols, the required actions to suppress adaptation and maximize internal validity often lead to reduced effectiveness:  adaptation to local conditions often increases intervention effectiveness relative to implementation of a fixed version of an intervention across heterogeneous settings.  This presentation introduces the new PCORI Methodology Committee Standards for Complex Interventions and discusses their role in research to (a) study and guide rather than suppress or ignore adaptation, achieving internal validity through adherence to an adaptation algorithm and through fidelity to function rather than form, and to (b) develop empirical evidence, insights and guidance for policy and practice decision makers who are charged with adapting and managing complex interventions rather than simply selecting and deploying simple, fixed interventions.

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Oct
8
12:00 PM12:00

TC-CFAR Seminar Series: JD Smith and Nanette Benbow

Landscape of NIH-funded HIV Implementation Research

JD Smith, Ph.D & Nanette Benbow, MAS
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Monday October 8th, 2018
12PM to 1PM CDT

Attend in person: Stonewall Conference Rooms, 625 N Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60611

Attend remotely: https://bluejeans.com/169025110

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Oct
2
12:00 PM12:00

Volker Grimm: Standard formats for describing and analyzing agent-based models

Standard formats for describing and analyzing agent-based models

Volker Grimm, Ph.D.
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research

10/02/2018

ABSTRACT:
In my presentation I will briefly summarize the scope and rationale of agent-based modelling. Then, after listing the main challenges of the agent-based approach, I will focus on how to make make agent-based more transparent and rigorous. I will introduce to ODD, a standard  format for describing ABMs, TRACE, a standard format for documenting the evaluation and validation of ABMs, and Robustness Analysis, a generic strategy for identifying robust theories.

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Sep
25
12:00 PM12:00

Geoffrey M. Curran: Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Designs: A Review and New Considerations

Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Designs: A Review and New Considerations

Geoffrey M. Curran, Ph.D.
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

ABSTRACT:
The presentation will provide an overview of effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs. Dr. Curran will review current trends in the use of these designs, provide examples of strong designs across the hybrid design continuum, and offer recommendations for hybrid design specifications, outcome measurement, and reporting.

Keywords: research design, implementation science, hybrid designs

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Sep
18
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Suicide Prevention - John Walkup, M.D.

Suicide prevention in Native communities: A CBPR approach

John Walkup, M.D.
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

ABSTRACT:  This presentation will focus on the evolution of a tribe-wide suicide prevention program based on a community based participatory research methodology.  The tribe experienced spikes in youth suicide that were devastating to the community and developed a strategy to make reporting of suicidal behavior to the suicide prevention team mandatory for all who live and work on the reservation. Based on data collected the tribe developed prevention strategies that addressed risk groups.  The most recent assessment suggest that suicide and suicide attempts decreased in from 2007-2012 from the early phase of the project in 2001-2006.

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