Sep
25
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Implementation Science - Geoffrey Curran

Hybrid Effectiveness-Implementation Designs: A Review and New Considerations

Geoff Curran, Ph.D.
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

ABSTRACT:
The presentation will provide an overview of effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs. Dr. Curran will review current trends in the use of these designs, provide examples of strong designs across the hybrid design continuum, and offer recommendations for hybrid design specifications, outcome measurement, and reporting.

Keywords: research design, implementation science, hybrid designs

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Oct
8
12:00 PM12:00

TC-CFAR Seminar Series: JD Smith & Nanette Benbow

Landscape of NIH-funded HIV Implementation Research

JD Smith, Ph.D & Nanette Benbow, MAS
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Monday October 8th, 2018
12PM to 1PM CDT

Attend in person: Stonewall Conference Rooms, 625 N Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60611

Attend remotely: https://bluejeans.com/169025110

DETAILS:
TBD.

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Oct
9
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Complex Interventions - Brian S. Mittman

Evaluating complex interventions: Confronting and guiding (versus ignoring and suppressing) heterogeneity and adaptation

Brian S. Mittman, Ph.D.
Kaiser Permanente

ABSTRACT:
Implementation strategies and many of the clinical and health service delivery interventions they aim to implement are characterized by multiple components targeting multiple behaviors and levels and are often characterized by extreme heterogeneity and adaptability.  Although researchers often attempt to standardize and achieve fidelity to highly-specified manualized intervention protocols, the required actions to suppress adaptation and maximize internal validity often lead to reduced effectiveness:  adaptation to local conditions often increases intervention effectiveness relative to implementation of a fixed version of an intervention across heterogeneous settings.  This presentation introduces the new PCORI Methodology Committee Standards for Complex Interventions and discusses their role in research to (a) study and guide rather than suppress or ignore adaptation, achieving internal validity through adherence to an adaptation algorithm and through fidelity to function rather than form, and to (b) develop empirical evidence, insights and guidance for policy and practice decision makers who are charged with adapting and managing complex interventions rather than simply selecting and deploying simple, fixed interventions.

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Oct
11
12:00 PM12:00

ISGMH: Current Issues in LGBTQ Health Lecture Series – Dr. Sari van Anders

Join our partners, ISGMH, for their “Current Issues in LGBTQ Health” lecture series featuring Dr. Sari Van Anders. ISGMH is cosponsoring this event with the Northwestern Department of Psychology.

This lecture will be on Thursday, October 11th 2018 in the Stonewall Conference Room of 625 N. Michigan Suite 1400. Stay tuned for more details!

To RSVP, please visit this page >>

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Oct
23
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Implementation Science - Kevin Haggerty

Implementation and dissemination of the Communities That Care prevention system to promote evidence-based practices in behavioral health

Kevin Haggerty, Ph.D.
Social Development Research Group
University of Washington

ABSTRACT: 

Communities That Care (CTC) is a community planning system for the prevention of youth behavior problems. CTC empowers community stakeholders and decision makers to select and implement tested and effective policies and programs most appropriate to their community’s needs by using strategic consultation, training, and research-based tools. We see CTC as providing what NIRN calls the “enabling context” for successful implementation of prevention focused EBPs.  This session will briefly summarize findings from the NIH/NIDA-funded community-randomized trial of CTC and describe efforts to expand capacity for implementation at scale using a new web-based video-assisted training system. The CTC prevention system has been shown to assist local communities in achieving these goals in a randomized trial. We will discuss how we have continued to focus on high quality implementation from the randomized trial to real world application of CTC.

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Oct
30
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Personalized Medicine - Philip Greenland & Joyce Ho

The NIH Precision Medicine Initiative: The All of Us Research Program

Philip Greenland, M.D.
Joyce Ho, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

ABSTRACT:
Precision medicine is a concept that was nearly unheard of prior to 2008, but in 2018, PubMed listed nearly 4000 citations for the term “precision medicine.” The National Institutes of Health launched an ambitious precision medicine initiative in 2015 and began recruiting participants into a 1 million person cohort study in 2017. To date, nearly 100,000 people have joined this effort, now called the “All of Us Research Program.” As described by the NIH, All of Us is “more than just a medical research program.” It is described as “a celebration of the American spirit in all its diversity and capacity to generate positive change.” The goal of the cohort study is to create a health care environment that is based on specific treatments for specific individuals. It takes into account factors like where a person lives, what activities they do, and what is their family health history. Precision medicine’s goal is to be able to tell people the best ways to stay healthy. If someone does become ill, precision medicine may help health care teams find the treatment that will work best. The study expects to provide researchers, patients, and doctors the information they need to make tailored recommendations, relevant to people of different backgrounds, ages, or regions.In this talk, Drs. Ho and Greenland will discuss the overall program goals as well as the evolving data elements and genomic analysis plan, and the researcher portal, which will enable researchers from anywhere to utilize data from the study. We will also discuss related projects, like the UK Biobank and the Million Veterans Study, to learn from those experiences and anticipate what we may learn from the All of Us Research Program.

Keywords: precision medicine; personalized medicine; genetics; health risks

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Nov
1
8:30 AM08:30

SYMPOSIUM: Third Coast Center for AIDS Research 2018 Annual Symposium

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Thursday November 1st, 2018
8:30AM to 4:30PM CDT
Gordon Center for Integrative Sciences, The University of Chicago

Join the Third Coast Center for AIDS Research 2018 Annual Symposium Ending the HIV Epidemic: Think Globally, Act Locally. This multidisciplinary symposium will draw important connections between HIV research in global settings and the lessons researchers can apply to their domestic work. Examples of the “global to local” approach will include innovations in HIV testing, prevention and care, as well as implementation science approaches to scale up of new interventions, and the role of research on non-communicable diseases and HIV.

Ambassador Deborah L. Birx, United States Global AIDS Coordinator will provide a keynote lecture on the scale up of HIV treatment through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programs.

Ce-PIM Director, Dr. C Hendricks Brown, will join Dr. Carlos Del Rio (Emory) and Dr. Moira McNulty (Univ of Chicago) as a presenter in Session III: Implementation Science to Accelerate the Cascades.

For more more information on this symposium, including the agenda, please visit: http://www.thirdcoastcfar.org/annual-symposium/

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Nov
13
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD

Optimizing Study Designs to Better Inform Individualized Treatment Decisions

Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD
Stanford University

ABSTRACT:
A paradigm shift is occurring in medicine and public health. Previously, trials were intended to identify the intervention with the greatest expected effect for a group of patients at risk for or diagnosed with a given disease or condition. As new and better interventions were identified this way, practice shifted towards the superior interventions. However, even if an intervention is best on average, some individuals may do better than expected while others may not do as well. Similarly, even if all individuals do about the same, some may have more serious adverse events/harms/unintended effects and others may have fewer. If differences in outcomes and harms with each intervention can be predicted for individuals, then the choice of intervention can be tailored and individualized – each person can get the intervention that most ideally achieves better health outcomes while minimizing harms for that person in particular. This is the new paradigm of individualized care, personalized medicine and health.   Individualized care holds great promise, but achieving this promise presents a number of challenges. One particular challenge that we focus on is when to individualize care based on current knowledge (information from completed studies) and when and how to design additional studies that should be conducted before care is individualized. Currently most trials focus on showing effects for the group as a whole. After the trial concludes, additional analyses attempt to predict which subgroups will benefit more from which treatment. Even when these analyses find differences, they may be highly uncertain because the original trial was not made large enough to precisely measure these differences at these subgroup levels. The subgroup findings are suggestive, and it may be tempting to individualize treatment based on them. Yet, because treatments carry both the promise of benefits and risks of harms and side-effects, additional studies may be warranted. But when? And how large of a study? And on which subgroups should the new study focus on?    Towards answering these questions, we describe a framework we developed. We then apply this framework using simulation model examples to characterize what are the characteristics of the subgroups and their expected benefits, risks and associated uncertainties as well as the maximum available sample size that determines optimal study designs for individualization decisions. In many cases, we consider optimal study designs diverge strongly (but predictably) from proportional random sampling schemes like those currently used in many randomized trials.

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Nov
15
12:00 PM12:00

ISGMH: Current Issues in LGBTQ Health Lecture Series – Joy Messinger

Join our partners, ISGMH, for their “Current Issues in LGBTQ Health” lecture series featuring Joy Messinger! The lecture is titled “Our Survival Depends on Each Other: The Urgency of Intersectionality to Support the Health, Wellness, and Healing of LGBTQ Communities."

This lecture will be on Thursday, November 15th 2018 from 12:00-1:30 pm in the Stonewall Conference Room of 625 N. Michigan Suite 1400.

To RSVP, please visit ISGMH's page and fill out the RSVP form >>


Abstract:
Joy’s lecture is titled “Our Survival Depends on Each Other: The Urgency of Intersectionality to Support the Health, Wellness, and Healing of LGBTQ Communities.” Intersectionality: an analysis of power, a trendy buzzword, an incorrectly applied theory of diversity… or all of the above? Despite increased media visibility and legislative and judicial victories for LGBTQ communities over the past decade, disparities in physical and mental health outcomes, experiences of violence and trauma, and access to wellness and healing remain for many who are not able-bodied cisgender middle class and wealthy white men. These disparities can be addressed through a deeper understanding of the ways that LGBTQ communities oppress each other and the implications this has for research, policy, funding, advocacy, and service delivery, especially in our current political moment. This talk will provide an ecological and empowerment-based approach to understanding intersectionality, biphobia, and monosexism that centers those most marginalized by mainstream LGBTQ narratives before moving into an application of how to address and resist the root causes of oppression within LGBTQ communities.

About the presenter:
Joy Messinger is an organizer of spreadsheets, money, and people to build sustainability, wellness, and power for reproductive and gender justice, queer and trans liberation, and disabled, immigrant, and POC communities. She has more than 15 years of experience in youth development, sexuality education, HIV/AIDS services and prevention, health communication research, and LGBTQ / QTPOC community building. Currently, Joy is a Program Officer for Third Wave Fund and an adjunct instructor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Prior to her position at Third Wave, Joy spent five years at the Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health in a variety of research, advocacy, education, and administrative roles to support the sexual health, rights, and identities of young people in Chicago and beyond. Joy holds degrees in public health, social work, and nonprofit leadership from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at the University of North Carolina and the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Born in Seoul, South Korea and raised in rural Western New York, Joy is in her seventh year of calling Chicago home and is a fervent supporter of public libraries, the Shonda Rhimes one-hour drama, kimchi (the pickle), and Kimchi (her cat).

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Sep
18
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Suicide Prevention - John Walkup, M.D.

Suicide prevention in Native communities: A CBPR approach

John Walkup, M.D.
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

ABSTRACT: This presentation will focus on the evolution of a tribe-wide suicide prevention program based on a community based participatory research methodology.  The tribe experienced spikes in youth suicide that were devastating to the community and developed a strategy to make reporting of suicidal behavior to the suicide prevention team mandatory for all who live and work on the reservation. Based on data collected the tribe developed prevention strategies that addressed risk groups.  The most recent assessment suggest that suicide and suicide attempts decreased in from 2007-2012 from the early phase of the project in 2001-2006.

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Sep
17
12:00 PM12:00

TC-CFAR Seminar Series: Dr. George Greene

"Oh Yeah, I'm down! A whole year to not think about taking a pill!": Understanding the acceptability of long-acting HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among young men who have sex with men

George Greene, Ph.D.
Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Monday September 17th
12 to 1PM

Attend in Person: Stonewall Conference Rooms, 625 N Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60611

Attend remotely: https://bluejeans.com/169025110

George J. Greene, Ph.D., (he/him) is the associate director of the Evaluation, Data Integration, and Technical Assistance Program (EDIT) and faculty in the Department of Medical Social Sciences at Northwestern University. Dr. Greene’s research interests focus on health disparities in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents and young adults, with a particular emphasis on ethnic/racial disparities in the HIV epidemic. His research aims to: (a) understand HIV risk and protective factors from intersectionality and developmental-ecological perspectives; (b) employ community-based participatory research approaches to build upon the needs and strengths of communities to identify and develop effective interventions; (c) design technology- and Internet-based approaches for observation and intervention; (d) adopt theoretically-driven program evaluation approaches to appropriately evaluate HIV prevention research and service efforts; and (e) apply qualitative and mixed methods approaches to research and program evaluation efforts

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Sep
17
8:00 AM08:00

Abstract Deadline: Third Coast Center for AIDS Research 2018 Annual Symposium

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Third Coast Center for AIDS Research 2018 Annual Symposium

Ending the HIV Epidemic: Think Globally, Act Locally

Abstracts due Monday September 17th
 

Symposium Date: Thursday November 1st, 2018
Symposium Time: 8:30AM to 4:30PM CDT
Symposium location: Gordon Center for Integrative Science, University of Chicago

Guidelines to submit abstracts can be found here: http://www.thirdcoastcfar.org/abstract-guidelines/

Register to attend the symposium by October 26th.

Ce-PIM Director, Dr. C Hendricks Brown, will join Dr. Carlos Del Rio (Emory) and Dr. Moira McNulty (Univ of Chicago) as a presenter in Session III: Implementation Science to Accelerate the Cascades.

Information on how to register and the symposium agenda can be found here: http://www.thirdcoastcfar.org/annual-symposium/

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Sep
14
to Sep 15

Symposium: Midwest LGBTQ Health Symposium

Moving Towards Health Equity. Strengthening Our Community of Care

Date: September 14th and 15th
Time: 7AM to 5PM
Location: JW Marriott, 151 W Adams St. Chicago, IL

The 2018 Midwest LGBTQ Health Symposium (MLHS) will explore this year’s theme “Moving Towards Health Equity. Strengthening our Community of Care.” The two-day gathering of healthcare professionals, social service providers, advocates, and researchers will highlight innovative best practices in LGBTQ patient-centered clinical care as well as community-driven approaches to addressing health disparities. Join us as we explore these critical topics and others - HIV elimination, racial equity in LGBTQ care, addressing violence and reproductive justice, as providers and advocates striving for meaningful change.

Please visit the conference website for more information on how to register and to view this year's schedule.

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Sep
7
8:00 AM08:00

Meeting: HIV Implementation Science Workshop Working Group

  • Johns Hopkins School of Public Health (map)
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HIV Implementation Science Workshop Working Group Meeting

Hosted by the Johns Hopkins Center for AIDS Research & Third Coast Center for AIDS Research

Friday September 7th 2018
8AM to 4PM EDT
Baltimore, MD

Ce-PIM faculty, Hendricks Brown, JD Smith, and Nanette Benbow will be attending an all day meeting of the HIV Implementation Science Working Group at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

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Aug
15
2:00 PM14:00

Symposium: State of Sexual & Gender Minority Health

Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health 3rd Annual Symposium: State of Sexual & Gender Minority Health

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Date: Wednesday August 15th
Time: 2:00 to 4:30PM (reception to follow)
Location: Aspen Hall 375 E. Chicago Ave. Chicago IL

DETAILS:
ISGMH's third annual symposium focuses on the intersection between racial and ethnic minorities and sexual and gender minority populations. Research and community experience show that these populations experience numerous discrimination, oppression and health disparities. Those who identify as a sexual or gender minority, and as a person of color, can experience these disparities in compounding ways. For example, transgender women of color and black gay men are at high risk for poor health outcomes, and there is a staggering disparity between their health outcomes and that of their heterosexual, cisgender and white peers. The objective of this Symposium is to identify areas where research can directly improve the health and wellbeing of ethnic, racial, sexual and gender minorities.

The Keynote Speaker at this year’s Symposium is Dr. Lisa Bowleg, a  professor of applied social psychology and the director of DC CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Core at The George Washington University. The Symposium will also feature speakers representing an interdisciplinary mix of Northwestern University faculty, postdoctoral and graduate students showcasing their research, as well as local community organizers.

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Aug
7
12:00 PM12:00

ISGMH: Current Issues in LGBTQ Health Lecture Series – André Pérez

Join our partners, ISGMH, for their “Current Issues in LGBTQ Health” lecture series featuring André Pérez! André will be discussing his work with the Trans Oral History project and America in Transition

This lecture will be on Tuesday, August 7th, 2018 from 12:00-1:30 in the Stonewall Conference Room of 625 N. Michigan Suite 1400. Stay tuned for more details!

To RSVP, please visit this page >>

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Aug
3
9:00 AM09:00

Presentation: CLaRO Training Institute

Implementation Science and It's Intimate Connection to Health Equity

C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Date: August 3rd, 2018
Time: 9am-11am
Location: Center for Latino Health Research Opportunities (CLaRO) Summer Training Institute
University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies
Room 115/116, 5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables, FL

DETAILS:
On August 3rd, Dr. Hendricks Brown will give a presentation at the Center for Latino Health Research Opportunities (CLaRO) Summer Training Institute. This interdisciplinary Center conducts and promots multi-level community-based participatory research to prevent SAVA syndemic conditions (substance abuse, violence/trauma and HIV/AIDS) and reduce their adverse health and mental health consequences. The Center emphasizes tailored interventions for Latino subgroups who represent pockets of vulnerability and require precise and specialized interventions that optimize access to and impact of interventions. From Friday, July 27th to Sunday, August 5th, the CLaRO Summer Training Institute will be held at the University of Miami.

DATES:
Friday, July 27, 2018: 8:30am- 3:00pm
Saturday, July 28, 2018: 8:30am- 12:00pm
Sunday, July 29, 2018: 8:30am- 12:00pm
Monday, July 30, 2018: 8:30am- 3:00pm
Tuesday, July 31, 2018: 8:30am- 3:00pm
Wednesday, August 1, 2018: 8:30am- 3:00pm
Thursday, August 2, 2018: 8:30am- 3:00pm
Friday, August 3, 2018: 8:30am- 12:00pm
Saturday, August 4, 2018: 8:30am- 11:30am
Sunday, August 5, 2018: 8:30am- 11:30am

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Jul
23
to Jul 27

NIMHD Health Disparities Research Institute

NIMHD Health Disparities Research Institute

The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) will host the Health Disparities Research Institute (HDRI) from July 23 - 27, 2018. The HDRI aims to support the research career development of promising minority health/health disparities research scientists early in their careers and stimulate research in the disciplines supported by health disparities science.

For more information, please visit https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/programs/edu-training/hd-research-institute/hdri_logon.asp

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Jun
19
to Jun 21

Implementation Science Institute

Implementation Science Institute

The University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine will be hosting the 2018 Implementation Science Institute June 19-21, 2018. The purpose of the Implementation Science Institute is to provide participants with the tools to design and execute rigorous implementation science research. The Institute will give an introduction to the foundations of implementation science (i.e., terminology, conceptual models and frameworks, study design). Students will also receive an overview of advanced topics including implementation strategies and sustainability. The course directors will cover tips for grant writing, skill development and time will be spent writing specific aims for Implementation Science grants. The Institute will also explicitly describe how principles of implementation science can be applied to practical implementation efforts.

For more information and to register, please visit http://news.consortiumforis.org/training/2018-implementation-science-institute-at-university-of-pennsylvania/

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Jun
12
11:00 AM11:00

Deadline: 2018 TIDIHR Applications

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Applications are currently being accepted for the 2018 Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH).

Applications are due on June 12, 2018 12:00 p.m. ET.

For more information, please visit
 https://www.scgcorp.com/tidirh2018/index.html

The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) in coordination with a number of National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), are hosting this training institute to provide participants with a thorough grounding in conducting D&I research in health across all areas of health and health care.

In 2018, the institute will utilize a combination of a 4-month online course (six modules with related assignments) between August 13 and November 30 , 2018, and a 2-day in-person training to be held December 6-7, 2018, in Bethesda, MD. Faculty and guest lecturers will consist of leading experts in theory, implementation, and evaluation approaches to D&I; creating partnerships and multilevel, transdisciplinary research teams; research design, methods, and analyses appropriate for D&I; and conducting research at different and multiple levels of intervention (e.g., clinical, community, policy).

Participants will be expected to return to their home institutions prepared to share what they have learned at the institute to help further the field of D&I research (e.g., giving talks, leading seminars, forming new collaborations, mentoring, submitting D&I grant proposals, etc.).

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Jun
7
to Jun 8

7th Annual Thomas R. Ten Have Symposium on Statistics in Mental Health

The 7th Annual Thomas R. Ten Have Symposium on Statistics in Mental Health

Invited Speakers and Discussants

Abstracts

Speaker and Discussant Biographies

Keynote Speaker: Tyler VanderWeele, Harvard School of Public Health: “Assessing Mediation, Interaction, and Causation in the Associations Between Religious Service Attendance and Suicide”
       Discussant: Naihua Duan, Columbia University

Hendricks Brown, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine: “Designing implementation trials for scaling up and scaling out evidence based interventions”
       Discussant: Larry Hedges, Northwestern University

Sherri Rose, Harvard Medical School: “Computational Health Economics and Clinical Informatics in Mental Health Research"
       Discussant: Neil Jordan, Northwestern University

Danny Almirall, University of Michigan: "Mixed-effects Modeling to Compare Dynamic Treatment Regimens with SMART Data"
       Discussant: Yuanjia Wang, Columbia University

Susan Paddock, Rand Corporation: “Causal inference for dynamic groups: Examining cognitive behavioral therapy session attendance and post-treatment depression”
       Discussant: Steve Raudenbush, University of Chicago

Haiqun Lin, Yale University: “Multiple Mediation Analysis with Latent Classes”
       Discussant: Robert Gibbons, University of Chicago

Mengling Liu, NYU: "Mediation Analysis with Censored Time-to-Event Mediator"
       Discussant: Bethany Bray, Penn State University

Melanie Wall, Columbia University: “Empirical methods for identifying optimal diagnostic criteria for psychiatric disorders"
       Discussant: Christine Mauro, Columbia University

Ian Barnett, University of Pennsylvania: “Multivariate change point detection methods with applications to relapse prediction in schizophrenia using smartphone monitoring”
       Discussant: Eva Petkova, NYU

Schedule

There will be a total of eight 35-minute regular invited talks each with a 15-minute discussion. The Keynote Address is 50 minutes with a 20-minute discussion.

Day 1 (June 7, 2018)

9:30am-10:00am: Registration and coffee

10:00am-10:10am: Welcome

10:10am-11:00am: Danny Almirall (Speaker) & Yuanjia Wang (Discussant)

11:00am-11:50am: Susan Paddock (Speaker) & Steve Raudenbush (Discussant)

11:50am-1:00pm: Lunch Onsite

1:00pm-1:50pm: Haiqun Lin (Speaker) & Robert Gibbons (Discussant)

1:50pm-2:40pm: Ian Barnett (Speaker) & Eva Petkova (Discussant)

2:40pm-3:00pm: Afternoon Coffee/Snack Break

3:00pm-4:10pm: Tyler VanderWeele (Keynote Speaker) & Naihua Duan (Discussant)

4:10pm-4:20pm: General Discussion

4:20pm-6:20pm: Happy Hour and poster session

6:30pm-8:00pm: Dinner at Beatrix (not included in registration fee)

 

Day 2 (June 8, 2018)

8:30am-9:00am: Continental breakfast onsite

9:00am-9:50am: Hendricks Brown (Speaker) & Larry Hedges (Discussant)

9:50am-10:40am: Sherri Rose (Speaker) & Neil Jordan (Discussant)

10:40am-11:00am: Mid-morning coffee/snack break

11:00am-11:50am: Melanie Wall (Speaker) & Christine Mauro (Discussant)

11:50am-12:40pm: Mengling Liu (Speaker) & Bethany Bray (Discussant)

12:40pm-1:00pm: Goodbye

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May
16
12:00 PM12:00

ISGMH: Current Issues in LGBTQ Health Lecture Series – Dr. E. Patrick Johnson

Join our partners, ISGMH, for their “Current Issues in LGBTQ Health” lecture series featuring Dr. E. Patrick Johnson! ISGMH is cosponsoring this event with the Northwestern Office of Institutional Diversity and Inclusion.

This lecture will be on Wednesday, May 16th 2018 from 12:00-1:30 pm in the Stonewall Conference Room of 625 N. Michigan Suite 1400. Stay tuned for more details!

To RSVP, please visit this page >>

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May
16
12:00 PM12:00

ISGMH: Current Issues in LGBTQ Health Lecture – Dr. E. Patrick Johnson

Join our partners, ISGMH, for their Current Issues in LGBTQ Health lecture series featuring Dr. E. Patrick Johnson! ISGMH is cosponsoring this event with the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

This lecture will be on Wednesday, May 16th 2018 from 12:00-1:30 pm in the Stonewall Conference Room of 625 N. Michigan Suite 1400. Lunch will be served and this event will be available to stream via BlueJeans.

This lecture/performance is based on oral histories of black southern women who desire women. Johnson will discuss some of the methodological challenges of being a man conducting research on women as well as cover some of the topics that he found to be common among many of the women he interviewed. In addition, Johnson will perform excerpts from some of the oral histories.

Please RSVP here. >> 

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May
8
12:00 PM12:00

Bengt Muthén & Tihomir Asparouhov: Intensive longitudinal data, multilevel modeling, and SEM: New features in Mplus version 8.1

Intensive Longitudinal Data, Multilevel Modeling, and SEM: New Features in Mplus Version 8.1

Bengt Muthén, Ph.D.
UCLA

Tihomir Asparouhov, Ph.D.
Mplus
 

ABSTRACT:
With the closely spaced repeated measurements in intensive longitudinal data (ILD), it becomes critical to allow for autocorrelation.  In many ILD models, the autocorrelation is represented as the outcome at one or more previous time points influencing the current outcome, but an alternative model represents this as auto correlated residuals. The Dynamic Structural Equation Modeling (DSEM) approach of Asparouhov et al. (2018) has therefore been expanded in Mplus Version 8.1 into RDSEM, residual DSEM.  Part 1 of this talk gives a brief overview of some key RDSEM models both for N=1 analysis and for N >1 multilevel analysis with random effects.  The development of Version 8.1 has also led to a new approach to multilevel analysis with random slopes for not only DSEM and RDSEM but also for general multilevel modeling.  Using the Bayes estimator, this makes it possible to use a latent variable decomposition of the predictor that enables latent mean centering avoiding the biases in common approaches.  Part 2 of the talk presents theory and applications for such random slope modeling.  Other general SEM developments in Mplus Version 8.1 include a convenient approach to check if two models are nested as well as several other new features.

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May
1
12:00 PM12:00

Byron Powell: Improving the design and application of implementation strategies

Improving the Design and Application of Implementation Strategies

Byron Powell, Ph.D., L.C.S.W.
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

ABSTRACT:
Effective implementation often requires the use of multifaceted, multilevel implementation strategies given the myriad barriers to delivering evidence-based practices in community settings. Ideally, the design of implementation strategies would be guided by theory, evidence, and pragmatic input from relevant stakeholders; however, methods to guide the application of implementation strategies are not well developed. There is a clear need for rigorous and practical methods to guide stakeholders in the identification, selection, and tailoring of implementation strategies for their contexts. This presentation will include an overview of emerging approaches to the design and application of implementation strategies, a discussion of key priorities for the field, and an introduction to a study focused on developing and piloting a novel method for tailoring implementation strategies to specific contexts.

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Apr
25
12:00 PM12:00

Third Coast CFAR Seminar: Rahm Gummuluru, PhD

Join our partners, the Third Coast Center for AIDS Research in Chicago for their bi-monthly seminar. 

Presenter: 
Rahm Gummuluru PhD
Associate Professor,
Department of Microbiology,
Boston University School of Medicine

Topic:
Mechanisms of HIV-Induced Chronic Inflammation and Immune Exhaustion

Time:
12pm - 1:00pm CT

Location: 
Stonewall Conference Rooms
Suite 1400
625 N. Michigan Ave
Chicago Campus
Northwestern University

About Dr. Gummuluru:
Research in my laboratory is broadly focused on the mechanisms of cell-­to-­cell  and  cell-­associated  HIV-­1 transmission with an emphasis on interactions of HIV with myeloid cells (monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells) and the implications of these interactions on systemic dissemination of HIV. I obtained a Ph.D. at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY where I studied mechanisms responsible for the rapid immunopathology and disease progression observed in SIVsmmPBj14-­infected  pig-­tailed  macaques.  

As a post-­ doctoral fellow at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, I focused on HIV-­1 pathogenesis, with an emphasis on host interactions of the HIV-­1 accessory protein, Vpr and the mechanism by which Vpr enhances  HIV-­1  replication.  I  am now an Associate  Professor in the Department of Microbiology at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and Co-­Director of the Developmental Core for the Lifespan/BU/BMC CFAR.

My research has been focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern interactions of HIV with myeloid cells. My laboratory has considerable expertise in molecular virology, identifying mechanisms of HIV-­induced immunopathology and cell biology of HIV infection. We were the first to identify the glycosphingolipid,   GM3, present in the virus particle membrane and the myeloid cell-­specific siglec, CD169/Siglec-­1, as the ligand-­receptor interaction necessary for capture of HIV-­1 particles by DCs, and transfer of the captured virus particles to the myeloid cell-­mediated trans infection pathway across virological synapses. The discovery of the GM3 – CD169 mechanism of virus particle recognition by my laboratory has paved the way for our recent efforts to develop nanoparticle-based myeloid  cell-­specific therapeutics for targeted delivery of  anti-­retrovirals to secondary lymphoid tissues.  In parallel,  we are focused on identifying mechanisms that drive persistent induction of innate immune activation in HIV-­infected myeloid cells, with the ultimate goal of developing immunotherapeutic approaches to diminish HIV-­induced chronic immune activation, the main driver of HANA conditions in cART-­suppressed individuals.

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Apr
24
12:00 PM12:00

Lisa Saldana: Considering the How with the What: Implementation fidelity to foster success

Considering the How with the What: Implementation fidelity to foster success

Lisa Saldana, Ph.D.
Oregon Social Learning Center

ABSTRACT:
Previous research has focused on developing and testing the 8-staged Stages of Implementation Completion (SIC)—an observational tool of implementation progress from Engagement (Stage 1) to development of Competency (Stage 8). The SIC provides a unique and rich source of real-world activities conducted by sites attempting to implement an EBP, and an assessment of inner and outer context variables of the sites. The SIC maps onto three phases of implementation (pre-implementation, implementation, and sustainability), and was developed as part of an implementation trial to assess sites' implementation process behavior and obtainment of milestones. Recent advances with the SIC suggest its potential utility as a measure of implementation fidelity; the SIC can reliably predict successful program start-up and achievement of program competency for sustainment based on both the quality and quantity of implementation activity completion.  This presentation will describe recent updates to SIC analyses, and the potential of the SIC to serve as a measure of implementation fidelity, across the span of implementation from Engagement to achievement of Competency in program delivery. Just as achieving high treatment fidelity is important to achieve successful clinical outcomes, this presentation will describe the value of achieving high implementation fidelity for successful implementation outcomes (e.g., sustainability).

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