Oct
22
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Depression - Darius Tandon

Mothers and Babies: Scaling an Evidence-Based Intervention Nationally to Improve Perinatal Mental Health

Shiv Darius Tandon, Phd

Institute for Public Health and Medicine

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

ABSTRACT:
An estimated 1 in 7 women are affected by postpartum depression. Experiencing postpartum depression makes it more likely that someone will have recurring depression in the future, poor attachment with her baby, relationship problems with her partner, and diminished economic stability. Mothers and Babies (MB) is a manualized intervention that has demonstrated efficacy via multiple RCTs in preventing onset of postpartum depression and reducing depressive symptoms. Recently, MB was highlighted as one of the two most efficacious perinatal depression preventive interventions by the United States Preventive Services Task Force. With increased national attention, our research lab has received a growing number of inquiries from healthcare systems, community-based organizations, and city and state health departments to train their providers to deliver MB. This presentation will describe our model for scaling MB via training and technical assistance. It will also share results from research studies we have conducted examining the implementation and sustainment of MB.

View Event →
Nov
5
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Kimberly Johnson

House on Fire: Addressing Opioid Overdose as an Epidemic

Kimberly Johnson, Phd, MBA

Research Associate Professor, University of South Florida

ABSTRACT:
There are standard public health models of addressing epidemics of contagious disease. This presentation will argue that if we use standard protocols that have been developed to address other epidemics, we would make greater progress in reducing the rate of drug overdose deaths in the United States. The presentation will remind participants of how smallpox was eradicated and what was learned about epidemic control in that effort as well as what is being learned in international efforts to eradicate the spread of HIV. The presentation will conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the current response to the opioid epidemic from a public health epidemic control perspective.

View Event →
Nov
19
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Kathryn McCollister

Health Economic Research Supporting the U.S. Response to the Opioid Crisis: Defining Cost Effective Interventions and Implementation Strategies

Kathryn McCollister, Phd

University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

ABSTRACT:
As the U.S. continues to grapple with the opioid epidemic, the National Institutes of Health, in collaboration with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, has recently launched several funding initiatives tasked with identifying, testing, and implementing evidence-based strategies to significantly reduce overdose fatalities and other negative consequences associated with opioid use disorders (OUD). Health economics research is highlighted as an important component to these new studies; specifically, the need for economic data informing resource allocation, cost effectiveness, and financing mechanisms that support the feasibility and sustainability of recommended strategies. This talk will describe the current state of knowledge on the cost effectiveness of treatment interventions and other strategies for OUD as well as relatively new questions relating to the economics of implementation at a broader community- or systems-level.

View Event →
Dec
17
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Jessica Magidson

Applying lessons learned from global mental health to the opioid crisis

Jessica Magidson, Phd

Department of Psychology

University of Maryland

ABSTRACT:
The current opioid crisis in the United States has been considered an “epidemic of poor access to care”. Similar to the shortage of trained providers to prescribe medications to treat opioid use disorder (OUD), there is a severe shortage of trained providers to meet the behavioral health needs of patients with OUD. This talk will draw from global mental health models of “task sharing” to discuss how lessons learned from scaling up evidence-based interventions with lay health workers in low and middle-income countries can inform efforts to increase access to behavioral health care for patients with OUD in the US. Research will be presented using peer recovery coach models to integrate substance use treatment into HIV care in South Africa and to promote linkage and retention in OUD care locally.

View Event →
Jan
7
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Emily C. Williams & Eric Hawkins

The SUpporting Primary care Providers in Opioid Risk reduction and Treatment (SUPPORT) center to increase identification and treatment of opioid use disorder in VA primary care: An operationally-partnered internal facilitation implementation effort

Emily C. Williams, Phd, MPH

Department of Health Services

University of Washington

Eric J. Hawkins, Phd

Addiction Medicine

VA Puget Sound Health Care System

ABSTRACT:
Opioid use disorders (OUD) are increasingly common and dangerous. Though medication treatment of OUD is effective, recommended, and can be offered in primary care settings where patients with OUD are frequently seen, it is substantially underused with multiple barriers to its provision. The SUpporting Primary care Providers in Opioid Risk reduction and Treatment (SUPPORT) Center is a partnership between researchers and clinical leaders to assist VA primary care clinics in identifying and treating OUD. We will describe our operationally-partnered implementation efforts using internal facilitation and use of rapid mixed-methods formative evaluation to refine our implementation strategies, and we will present up-to-date evaluation results.

View Event →
Jan
14
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Andrew Quanbeck

Using Systems Consultation to Improve Opioid Prescribing in Primary Care: Protocol for a Sequential, Multiple-Assignment Randomized Trial (SMART)

Andrew Quanbeck, Phd

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health

University of Wisconsin

School of Medicine and Public Health

ABSTRACT:
Background (context and purpose of the study) Health care systems are notoriously slow to adopt clinical guidelines and other evidence-based practices, in part because the literature offers little help about which implementation strategies work best in different clinical settings and how strategies could be tailored to maximize their effectiveness in different contexts. This study tests a blended implementation strategy called systems consultation to improve concordance with clinical guideline for opioid prescribing in primary care. Systems consultation consists of the following theoretically and empirically proven strategies: (1) an educational meeting followed by audit and feedback, (2) practice facilitation, and (3) physician peer consulting. The study aims to discover the most cost-effective sequence and combination of strategies for improving opioid prescribing practices in diverse primary care clinics.

Methods (how the study will be performed) The study is a hybrid type 3 cluster-randomized sequential multiple-assignment randomized trial (SMART) that randomizes clinics at two timepoints, months 3 and 6 of an 18-month intervention period. The study will compare the effect on morphine-milligram equivalent dose of the elements of systems consultation. Four combinations of implementation strategies will be assessed: an educational meeting and audit and feedback alone (AF), AF plus practice facilitation (PF), AF + PF plus physician peer consulting (PPC), and AF + PPC. In addition, an assessment of system-, clinic-, and prescriber-level contextual factors will be developed and tested to build a tool for tailoring strategies to different clinics, and a cost estimate will be conducted of the strategies that make up systems consultation. The study aims to enroll up to 38 clinics from three health systems. Mixed methods will be used to evaluate systems consultation using the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework. Clinics will be the primary unit of analysis.

Discussion (summary and potential implications) Systems consultation is a practical blend of evidence-based strategies, in this case used to improve opioid prescribing practices in primary care. The blend offers a range of strategies from minimally to substantially intensive to make available the most cost-effective strategy(ies) for specific clinical contexts. Systems consultation and the adaptive approach used to deliver the strategy may generalize to the adoption of other evidence-based practices as well.

View Event →

Oct
18
12:00 PM12:00

Symposium: ISGMH Suicide Prevention Symposium

The State of SGM Health: Suicide Prevention Symposium

Date: Friday, October 18, 2019
Time: 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: Center on Halsted, 3656 N Halsted St, Chicago IL 60613

DETAILS:
ISGMH’s  State of Sexual and Gender Minority (SGM) Health Symposium convenes researchers, policy makers, community–based organizations, LGBTQ youth, and community members to discuss the health disparities and resiliency of LGBTQ people. The symposium presents an opportunity to spark interdisciplinary conversations on best practices and policies for supporting the health of LGBTQ communities. Following formal presentations and panels on the research and current work in LGBTQ health, attendees are invited to a reception providing the opportunity to connect across disciplines and organizations.

Since the inaugural Symposium in 2016, each Symposium closely examines the health and wellbeing of a specific intersection in the LGBTQ community. The 2019 Symposium will focus on the topic of suicide prevention, and will take place at Center on Halsted’s Hoover-Leppen Theater at 3656 N. Halsted Street, Chicago IL 60613. We will have two keynote speakers, Pidgeon Pagonis and Dr. Caitlin Ryan, a panel, and performances by the Youth Empowerment Performance Project (YEPP). The 2019 Symposium is supported by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

ABSTRACT:
To be uploaded at a later time.

For more information about this workshop, please visit this website.

View Event →
Oct
15
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Implementation Science - Nathaniel Williams

Conceptualizing and Testing Multilevel Mechanisms of Change in Implementation Science

Nathaniel J. Williams, PhD., LCSW
Boise State University

ABSTRACT:
An important step toward the development and targeting of optimally effective, efficient, and feasible implementation strategies involves identification of the mechanisms through which these strategies influence implementation and clinical outcomes. This presentation will provide an overview of the conceptualization, measurement, and analysis of multilevel mechanisms in implementation science with an emphasis on the application of multilevel mediation analysis. Dr. Williams will review the state-of-the-science on testing implementation mechanisms and will illustrate a highly general mediation approach for testing multilevel mechanisms, using as examples studies focused on organizational leadership and organizational social context.

View Event →
Oct
8
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Arthur Robin Williams

Long-term buprenorphine treatment for OUD and adverse events following discontinuation among Medicaid beneficiaries

Arthur Robin Williams, M.D.
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University

ABSTRACT:
Background: Buprenorphine reduces the risk of overdose and death among patients with opioid use disorder, yet to date, an empiric basis for the optimal length of treatment is lacking. Adverse health outcomes following buprenorphine discontinuation were compared among patients who were successfully retained beyond six months of continuous treatment akin to the "Retention" stage of the OUD Cascade of Care.

Methods: Retrospective longitudinal cohort within MarketScan multi-state US Medicaid claims (2013-2017) covering 12 million beneficiaries annually. The sample included adults 18-64 years old who received buprenorphine continuously for ≥180 days by cohorts retained for 6-9 months (n=4,126), 9-12 months (n=2,440), 12-15 months (n=1,499), and 15-18 months (n=931) with claims extending 6 months following discontinuation to assess outcome events. Primary adverse outcomes included all-cause emergency department visits, inpatient hospital admissions, filled opioid prescriptions, and overdose, controlling for demographic characteristics and comorbid mental health and substance use diagnoses.

Results: Rates of adverse events were high across all cohorts following buprenorphine discontinuation with approximately half of patients (42-50%) seen in the emergency department at least once during the 6 months following discontinuation. Compared to those retained for 6-9 months, patients retained for 15-18 months had lower odds of all-cause emergency department visits (OR 0.70, 95%CI 0.60-0.90, p<0.001), all-cause inpatient hospitalizations (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.6-1.0, p<0.05), and filling opioid prescriptions (OR 0.70, 95%CI 0.60-0.80, p<0.001) in the six months following discontinuation. Approximately 5% of persons across all cohorts experienced one or more medically treated overdoses in the 6 months following buprenorphine discontinuation. Analysis was limited to beneficiaries in multiple unidentified states and could not account for mortality outcomes.

Conclusion: Risk of acute care service use and overdose were high following buprenorphine discontinuation irrespective of treatment duration. Superior outcomes became significant with treatment duration beyond 15 months but remained concerning suggesting a minimum of 6 months is insufficient. Improvements at all levels of care are needed to increase retention of patients on buprenorphine.

View Event →
Oct
1
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Bryan Garner & Sara Becker

Project MIMIC (Maximizing Implementation of Motivational Incentives in Clinics): A type 3 effectiveness-implementation hybrid trial

Bryan Garner, Ph.D.
Research Triangle Institute (RTI)

Sara Becker, Ph.D.
Department for Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health

ABSTRACT:
There is an urgent public health need to improve the outcomes of individuals with opioid use disorders (OUDs). There are currently five approved medication formulations, which relative to placebo have demonstrated effectiveness in helping patients attain abstinence from opioids. Nonetheless, patients’ opioid abstinence rates are sub-optimal: even when treated with the newest extended-release formulations only about 40% of patients maintain abstinence during the first 6-months of treatment. Contingency Management (CM) is one of the only behavioral treatment shown to improve OUD pharmacotherapy outcomes, yet implementation of CM within OUD treatment centers remains quite low. Project MIMIC is a type 3 effectiveness-implementation hybrid trial to test the effectiveness of an enhanced-version of the Addiction Technology Transfer Center’s current multifaceted implementation strategy on both implementation outcomes (primary aim) and patient outcomes (secondary aim). For this PSMG web-presentation, Drs. Becker and Garner (Project MIMIC’s principal investigators) will teach others about the project and its protocol, with special emphasis on helping the audience learn more about the project’s two implementation conditions, key challenges, and key lessons learned.

View Event →
Sep
24
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Depression - William Beardslee

Opportunities and Challenges in the Dissemination of Depression Prevention Strategies: Reflections on Three Trials.

William R. Beardslee, MD
Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

ABSTRACT:
Dr. Beardslee will review three separate depression prevention trials in terms of their implications for dissemination of evidence-based depression prevention strategies. One, the Prevention of Depression Project employed a cognitive behavioral group prevention based on the Coping with Depression and showed sustained effects. A second evaluated a problem solving preventive approach in Headstart mothers. A third, the Preventive Intervention Project used a psychoeducational on narrative approach for families with parental depression.

View Event →
Workshop: NIH HIV Action Workshop
Sep
19
to Sep 20

Workshop: NIH HIV Action Workshop

  • Natcher Conference Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

National Institutes of Health Action Workshop:
HIV-associated Comorbidities, Co-infections, and Complications Workshop

Date: Thursday & Friday, September 19-20 2019
Time: 9:00AM to 5:00PM
Location: Natcher Conference Center, NIH Campus Bethesda, MD

DETAILS:
Ce-PIM Associate Director, JD Smith, presenting at the HIV Action Workshop.

ABSTRACT:
To be uploaded at a later time.

For more information about this workshop, please visit this website.

View Event →
Sep
17
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Opioids - Richard Rawson

Stimulant Use Disorders: Epidemiology, Clinical Challenges, and Review of Treatments

Richard Rawson, PhD

Department of Psychiarty, UCLA

ABSTRACT:
Methamphetamine and cocaine use rates and overdose deaths are rapidly increasing in much of the US.  The presentation will review the clinical challenges presented by individuals who use stimulants and current protocols for addressing acute medical/psychiatric conditions.  Evidence-based behavioral/psychosocial strategies are presented, along with pharmacotherapies currently considered promising.

View Event →
Sep
11
9:00 AM09:00

Presentation: Pediatric Health Behavior Research

Innovations in Health Behavior Research Symposium:
Pediatric Health Behavior Research

JD Smith, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Date: Wednesday, September 11th 2019
Time: 9:00AM to 4:00PM
Location: University of Utah Medical School

DETAILS:
Ce-PIM Associate Director, JD Smith, will be presenting at the Innovations in Health Behavior Reach Symposium on the topic of Pediatric Health Behavior Research

ABSTRACT:
Will be uploaded at a later time

For more information on this symposium, please visit the symposium website

View Event →
Sep
10
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Violence Prevention - Andrew Papachristos

Who’s Next? Using Network Science to Understand and Do Something about Gun Violence

Andrew V. Papachristos, PhD

Department of Sociology, Northwestern University

Abstract: It’s a cliché to say “we live in a connected world.” But we do. Over the last twenty years, the field of Network Science has consistently demonstrated that the ways in which people are connected affect what we feel, think, and do. The structure of social networks have a profound impact on the friends we make, the people we marry, the votes we cast, the diseases we catch, and the ways we think. This presentation explores how network science might help us better understand gun violence in American cities. This talk explores how mapping and analyzing social networks can help predict the victims of gun violence in U.S. cities as well as offer possible pathways to guide gun violence prevention efforts.

View Event →
Aug
9
9:00 AM09:00

Presentation: Implementation Science and its Intimate Connection to Health Equity: Delivering on the Promise of "Health for All"

Implementation Science and its Intimate Connection to Health Equity: Delivering on the Promise of "Health for All"

Hendricks Brown, Ph.D.
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

Date: 8/9/2019

ABSTRACT:
Implementation Science has a unique opportunity to ameliorate health disparities and improve the health for all. But current research studies are not addressing the scientific inequities in building knowledge to address disparities among minorities and other populations experiencing historical or new disparities. We discuss three ways to advance such research using existing data, simulation modeling, and borrowing strength from existing related research studies, what we call scaling out. We also present a tool that aids in the design of rollout trials, including adaptations of stepped wedge designs, and show how this can focus a research design on addressing health disparities in implementation and hybrid designs. 

View Event →
Jun
27
12:00 PM12:00

TC-CFAR Workshop: Applying for NIH Supplements to Promote Diversity in the Health Research Workforce

  • Northwestern University - Chicago Campus, Stonewall Conference Rooms (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
TCCFAR.png

Workshop: Applying for NIH Supplements to Promote Diversity in the Health Research Workforce

Brian Mustanski, Ph.D.
Co-Director, Ce-PIM Methods Core

Thursday, June 27, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm CDT

This local workshop, led by Dr. Brian Mustanski, will describe NIH funding opportunities to promote diversity in the health research workforce. The session will include tips for building productive partnerships and developing competitive applications for these funds.

Fostering diversity by addressing underrepresentation in the scientific research workforce is a key component of the NIH strategy to identify, develop, and support future scientists and research personnel. Therefore, NIH offers opportunities for eligible PI/PDs with active grants to apply for supplemental funds to support and enhance the research careers of individuals from groups underrepresented in the health research workforce. (See PA-18-906)

Attend In-Person: Stonewall Conference Rooms, 625 N Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60611

Attend Remotely: https://bluejeans.com/169025110/browser

For more information about attending and to register for the workshop, please visit:
https://www.thirdcoastcfar.org/events/workshop-nih-diversity-supplements/

View Event →
May
31
to Jun 1

ISGMH: 2019 National LGBTQ Health Conference

6th National LGBTQ Health Conference:
Bridging Research & Practice

Friday May 31st to Saturday June 1st 2019
With an NIH Pre-Conference Workshop on Thursday May 30th
At Emory University in Atlanta, GA.


About the Conference

The National LGBTQ Health Conference is an interdisciplinary translational research conference bringing together scientists, public health professionals, and healthcare providers to discuss issues affecting the health and wellbeing of the LGBTQ community while fostering professional development and networking opportunities.


Conference Highlights

  • Nationally-recognized Keynote Speakers: Dr. Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable, Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National Institutes of Health, and Kierra Johnson, Deputy Executive Director of the National LGBTQ Task Force

  • Expert panel and breakout sessions showcasing emerging research and practice

  • Poster symposium

  • Professional Development Institute hosted by NIH on May 30

  • Continuing education units will be offered

View Event →
May
21
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Kosuke Imai

Design and Analysis of Two-Stage Randomized Experiments

Kosuke Imai, PhD

Harvard University

Abstract: In many social science experiments, subjects often interact with each other and as a result, one unit's treatment can influence the outcome of another unit. Over the last decade, a significant progress has been made towards causal inference in the presence of such interference between units.  In this talk, we will discuss two-stage randomized experiments, which enable the identification of the average spillover effects as well as that of the average direct effect of one's own treatment.  In particular, we consider the setting with noncompliance, in which some units in the treatment group do not receive the treatment while others in the control group may take up one.  This implies that there may exist the spillover effect of the treatment assignment on the treatment receipt as well as the spillover effect of the treatment receipt on the outcome.  To address this complication, we generalize the instrumental variables method by allowing for interference between units and show how to identify the average complier direct effect.  We also establish the connections between our nonparametric randomization-inference approach and the two-stage least squares regression.   The proposed methodology is motivated by and applied to an ongoing randomized evaluation of the India's National Health Insurance Program (RSBY).  Joint work with Zhichao Jiang and Anup Malani

View Event →
May
14
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Mark McGovern, PhD

The US opioid epidemic: A public health crisis and opportunity for implementation research

Mark A. McGovern, PhD

Stanford University

Abstract: The US opioid epidemic has exposed a significant gap in access to evidence-based care for persons who suffer from opioid use disorders. Although effective medications exist for opioid addiction, they are not widely available. This presentation describes several system level initiatives to increase reach and adoption, in efforts close the implementation gap. An emphasis will be on lessons learned, and how more rigorous implementation research methods may be brought to bear to address this major public health problem.

View Event →
May
7
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Todd Molfenter, PhD

Leveraging Treatment & Recovery Services to Address the Opioid Crisis

Todd Molfenter, PhD

University of Wisconsin - Madison, Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies

Abstract: Dr. Molfenter will provide an overview of the “Opioid Crisis” in the United States and how it is impacting research opportunities in the addiction treatment and Implementation Science fields.  Causes and impact of the epidemic will initially be discussed. Then, opioid use disorder treatment evidence-based practices will be described. Followed by the gaps and challenges being experience in getting these practices implemented and research we have conducted to better understand how to get these practices implemented (or scaled-up) into broader practice.

View Event →
Apr
23
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Guanglei Hong

Weighting-Based Sensitivity Analysis in Causal Mediation Studies

Guanglei Hong, PhD

University of Chicago

Inaugural Chair, Committee on Quantitative Methods in Social, Behavioral, and Health Sciences

Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Human Development

Abstract: Through a sensitivity analysis, the analyst attempts to determine whether a conclusion of causal inference could be easily reversed by a plausible violation of an identification assumption. Analytic conclusions that are harder to alter by such a violation are expected to add a higher value to scientific knowledge about causality. This article presents a weighting-based approach to sensitivity analysis for causal mediation studies. Extending the ratio-of-mediator-probability weighting (RMPW) method for identifying natural indirect effect and natural direct effect, the new strategy assesses potential bias in the presence of omitted pretreatment or posttreatment covariates. Such omissions may undermine the causal validity of analytic conclusions. The weighting approach to sensitivity analysis reduces the reliance on functional form assumptions and removes constraints on the measurement scales for the mediator, the outcome, and the omitted covariates. In its essence, the discrepancy between a new weight that adjusts for an omitted confounder and an initial weight that omits the confounder captures the role of the confounder that contributes to the bias. The effect size of the bias due to omitted confounding of the mediator-outcome relationship is a product of two sensitivity parameters, one associated with the degree to which the omitted confounders predict the mediator and the other associated with the degree to which they predict the outcome. The article provides an application example and concludes with a discussion of broad applications of this new approach to sensitivity analysis. Supplementary material includes R code for implementing the proposed sensitivity analysis procedure.

View Event →
Apr
16
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Maya Mathur

Sensitivity analyses for unmeasured confounding in studies and meta-analyses

Maya Mathur, PhD

Harvard University

Abstract: Observational studies and meta-analyses may be compromised by unmeasured confounding. We describe simple metrics characterizing the sensitivity of single studies and meta-analyses to such confounding. For a single study, the “E-value” is defined as the minimum strength of association, on the risk ratio scale, that an unmeasured confounder would need to have with both the treatment and the outcome to fully explain away a specific treatment–outcome association, conditional on the measured covariates. A large E-value implies that considerable unmeasured confounding would be needed to explain away an effect estimate. A small E-value implies little unmeasured confounding would be needed to explain away an effect estimate. For meta-analyses, we will quantify the extent to which unmeasured confounding of specified magnitude could reduce to below a certain threshold the proportion of true effects that are of scientifically meaningful size. We also develop converse methods to estimate the strength of confounding capable of reducing the proportion of scientifically meaningful true effects to below a chosen threshold. All methods can be implemented with the R package EValue. 

View Event →
Apr
2
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Mona Sharifi

Examining the Cost-Effectiveness of Childhood Obesity Interventions

Mona Sharifi, MD, MPH

Yale School of Medicine

Abstract: Excess health care costs attributable to obesity demand effective and efficient strategies. To facilitate appropriate resource allocation, economic evaluations can aid explicit assessments of intervention efficiency and allow for comparisons between interventions. Such analyses are lacking in pediatric obesity management. This talk will review the methods and results of cost-effectiveness analyses using a microsimulation model of the national implementation of childhood obesity interventions.

View Event →
Mar
26
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Jonathan D. Klein

Improving Adolescent’s Access to Care:

the Adolescent Health Consortium Project

Jonathan D. Klein, MD, MPH

University of Illinois at Chicago

Abstract:  

Adolescence and young adulthood are characterized by significant physical, emotional and intellectual growth as well as increased vulnerability and risk taking. The decisions that young people make and the behaviors they engage in can have serious short- and long-term health consequences. Clinical preventive services can reduce the negative consequences of adolescent risk-taking behaviors. Guideline based periodic health care visit visits present an opportunity to provide preventive services that can reduce adolescents’ engagement in—and mitigate the impact of—risky behaviors.

Preventive services that have proven effective in reducing harm to adolescents and young adults include: immunization; screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections; reproductive and sexual health care services, including contraception; and screening and counseling to reduce risky behaviors including tobacco, alcohol and drug use and to address injury prevention, mental health, obesity, physical activity, and other health topics. However, most young people in the United States do not receive these recommended preventive clinical care services. While many adolescents and their parents report having had health care visits, and when visits do occur, many young people report that they lack one- on-one confidential discussion with their clinician.

In response to these missed opportunities, four national medical societies— the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM), and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)— have collaborated on a five-year adolescent health consortium initiative with two overarching goals: 1) to improve parental and youth awareness of the importance and value of preventive health care services; and 2) to increase the number of young people who receive appropriate preventive health care services, including confidential services within professional, ethical and legal guidelines.

The project has conducted with research to identify gaps in knowledge about the importance of preventive services among the project’s target audiences and develop effective traditional and new media technologies as tools for improving preventive health care services for adolescents and young adults.  Today’s presentation will concentrate on the data from focus groups with parents, adolescents and young adults, and health care providers, and on data derived from a nationally representative on-line survey of adolescents and their parents, and of young adults. We will present in-depth data on current youth and parent awareness of the value of preventive health care and the barriers and facilitators that prevent young people from access to and use of appropriate and needed care.

The partner organizations have developed communication strategies, messages and tools sharing information about the value of preventive health care services, and each partner is leading communication activities within their organization to incorporate key messages into new and existing education and outreach activities and to develop education and practice-change quality improvement interventions for their members.

View Event →
Mar
19
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Saul Weiner, MD

Patient-Collected Audio Recorded Encounters for Provider Feedback to Reduce Contextual Errors: An Implementation Study

Saul Weiner, MD

University of Illinois College of Medicine | Chicago

ABSTRACT: Dr. Weiner will discuss his ongoing research Patient-Collected Audio Recorded Encounters for Provider Feedback to Reduce Contextual Errors which utilizes an Effectiveness-Implementation type 2 hybrid design to study an innovative quality improvement project to enhance physician attention to patient life context in care planning.  The effectiveness of an audit & feedback intervention is assessed utilizing a  stepped wedge cluster randomized trial as it rolls out across six health care facilities. The implementation process is guided by the RE-AIM framework.

View Event →
Mar
12
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Kara Palamountain

Ensuring Success: Introduction & Implementation of Point of Care Testing in sub-Saharan Africa

Kara Palamountain, MBA

Northwestern University, Kellogg School of Management

Abstract: Reducing the time it takes to diagnose and treat persons living with HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis is critical for the individual and to public health.  This presentation identifies three approaches for reducing time to diagnosis and treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, including: 1) Point of Care (POC) Tests 2) Placement of POC devices within clinics and health systems and 3) optimizing sample and result transport networks.

View Event →
Mar
5
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: David Mohr & Madhu Reddy

Re-envisioning Digital Mental Health: addressing the research-to-practice gap

David Mohr, Ph.D. & Madhu Reddy, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

ABSTRACT:
Depression is a common problem that imposes a tremendous societal burden in terms of cost, morbidity, quality of life, and mortality. However, few people are able to obtain adequate or appropriate treatment for depression. Digital mental health (DMH) technologies such as web-based and mobile applications have shown great potential, with a large number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) consistently demonstrating efficacy, particularly when coupled with support from a clinician or coordinator. Yet for all of the promise, evidence shows these findings do not carry over when these tools are implemented in real-world settings. Indeed, a large-scale implementation trial of two well-known web-based tools (Beating the Blues and MoodGym) for treating depression found that patients did not want to engage with the tools. This research-to-practice gap is not being addressed by our current approaches for designing, implementing, and evaluating DMH technologies. In particular, we face three major challenges: (1) these technologies are often designed without sufficient stakeholder input throughout the design process; (2) we often plan for implementation only after the efficacy testing is completed; and (3) technological capabilities, care systems, and user expectations change rapidly but we currently are not flexible and rapid in how we respond to these changes.

In this presentation, we will discuss how we are attempting to address these research-to-practice gaps through our Accelerated Creation-to-Sustainment (ACTS) model developed by our multidisciplinary team of clinical sciences and HCI researchers. In particular, we will focus on the work that we are doing to try to better understand the needs of users, both patient and healthcare organization stakeholders, in terms of DMH technologies and services. We will then conclude with some thoughts about future directions for the field of digital mental health.

View Event →
Feb
19
to Feb 20

PSMG: Milica Miočević

Bayesian Mediation Analysis

Milica Miočević, PhD

Utrecht University

Abstract: Mediation analysis is used to study intermediate variables (M) that transmit the effect an independent variable (X) has on a dependent variable (Y). For example, a researcher might be interested in whether an intervention designed to reduce unhealthy lifestyle behaviors (X) affects fruit and vegetable consumption (M), which in turn affects general health (Y). In this study, the quantity of interest is the indirect effect of the intervention on general health through fruit and vegetable consumption. Two prominent approaches to data analysis are the classical (also called “frequentist”) and the Bayesian approach. In recent years researchers in social sciences have turned to Bayesian methods when they encounter convergence issues (Chen, Choi, Weiss, & Stapleton, 2014), issues due to small samples (Lee & Song, 2004), and when they wish to report the probability that a parameter lies within a certain interval (Rindskopf, 2012).In the frequentist framework, evidence for the presence of mediation is obtained by testing the statistical significance of the product of coefficients comprising the indirect effect. The distribution of the mediated effect is often asymmetric (Craig, 1936; Lomnicki, 1967; Springer & Thompson, 1966), and the best classical methods for evaluating the significance of the mediated effect either take the asymmetric distribution of the product into account or make no distributional assumptions at all (Cheung 2007, 2009; MacKinnon, Fritz, Williams, & Lockwood 2007; MacKinnon, Lockwood, & Williams, 2004; MacKinnon, Lockwood, Hoffmann, West, & Sheets, 2002; MacKinnon, et al., 1995; Shrout & Bolger, 2002; Tofighi & MacKinnon, 2011; Valente, Gonzalez, Miočević, & MacKinnon, 2016; Yuan & MacKinnon, 2009).Bayesian methods offer an easy way to take into account the asymmetric distribution of the mediated effect, and to compute functions of the mediated effect, e.g. effect size measures and causal estimates of indirect and direct effects. Furthermore, Bayesian methods provide an intuitive framework for the inclusion of relevant prior information into the statistical analysis. In this talk I will discuss the pros and cons of Bayesian methods for mediation analysis, and I will illustrate some advantages and challenges of Bayesian mediation analysis using an example data set from a study of alcohol consumption of college students in the United States. I will conclude with recommendations that can be made for applied researchers based on the methodological literature on Bayesian mediation analysis thus far, and with some future directions for this line of research.

View Event →
Feb
5
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Aaron Lyon

How implementable is that evidence-based practice?

Designing and supporting streamlined and contextually-appropriate innovations in behavioral health

Aaron Lyon, Ph.D.
University of Washington

ABSTRACT:
At their core, evidence-based psychosocial interventions (EBPIs) can be considered products intended for a range of different types of users. Usability – the extent to which a product can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency, and satisfaction – is a key “upstream” determinant of implementation and service outcomes. Drawing from the field of user-centered design, this session will discuss common usability issues encountered for EBPIs in behavioral health, how they impact implementation outcomes, and the application of user-centered design methodologies to assess and improve the usability and implementability of complex psychosocial interventions in behavioral health.

View Event →
Jan
29
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Sandro Galea

SYSTEMS SCIENCE AND POPULATION HEALTH

Sandro Galea, M.D., Ph.D.
Boston University

ABSTRACT:
Population health is the product of complex systems. It is characterized by discontinuities, non-linearities, reciprocity, and emergent properties. This requires clarity about our conceptualization of population health and the approaches we take towards answering population health science questions. This presentation will discuss the fundamental principles of population health science and how it intersects with complex systems perspectives, using examples from ongoing modeling work.

View Event →
Jan
22
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Gregory E. Simon

Predicting suicidal behavior:

Artificial intelligence for actual human users

Gregory E. Simon, MD, MPH
Kaiser Permanente

ABSTRACT:
This presentation will describe work by the NIMH-funded Mental Health Research Network (www.mhresearchnetwork.org) to develop and implement tools to identify and assess risk of suicidal behavior in large integrated healthcare systems.  Using this example, the presentation will describe collaboration with health system stakeholders in the development and implementation of machine learning prediction models.  Discussion will illustrate general principles to improve the practical utility of machine learning or artificial intelligence tools.

View Event →
Jan
15
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Lisa Hirschhorn

How Rwanda succeeded: Using implementation science to understand the success in reducing under-5 mortality between 2000 and 2015

Lisa Hirschhorn, M.D., MPH
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

ABSTRACT:
Understanding how some low and middle income countries have been more successful in dropping mortality in children under5 is a high priority as the global community works to continue in work to achieve effective universal health coverage and the new Sustainable Development Goals. Rwanda has been a leader in this area, yet how they achieved a remarkable decline despite having to rebuild their health system starting in the 2003. We will present the process to develop and apply an Implementation science framework and methods to understand the implementation strategies to expand evidence based interventions know to reduce under-5 mortality and results in developing transferable knowledge

View Event →
Jan
8
12:00 PM12:00

PSMG: Mariel Finucane

What Works for Whom?
Bayesian Adaptive Design for Prevention Research

Mariel Finucane, PhD

M50 | Mathematica Policy Research

ABSTRACT: A Bayesian approach to randomized program evaluations efficiently identifies what works for whom. The Bayesian design adapts to accumulating evidence: Over the course of an evaluation, more study subjects are allocated to treatment arms that are more promising, given the specific subgroup from which each subject comes. We identify conditions under which there is more than a 90% chance that inference from the Bayesian adaptive design is superior to inference from a standard design, using less than one third the sample size.

View Event →
Dec
15
8:00 AM08:00

Abstract Deadline: 2019 National LGBTQ Health Conference

logo_National_LBRP_lrg.png

Call for Abstracts:
Due December 15th 2018

6th National LGBTQ Health Conference:
Bridging Research & Practice

Friday May 31st to Saturday June 1st 2019
With an NIH Pre-Conference Workshop on Thursday May 30th
At Emory University in Atlanta, GA.

Abstracts due: December 15th 2018

 For more Information please visit the conference website: https://lgbtqconference.dryfta.com/en/

View Event →